Info Ethics and Info Policy Joint SIG Activities at ALISE

Dear members of the Information Ethics and Information Policy Special Interest Groups (SIGs),

As you begin your preparation for ALISE’s annual meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee, the conveners of the SIGs would like to bring to your attention important information about participating in SIG activities.

Joint Panel

This year, the SIGs collaborated to develop a joint session titled “More Data, More Problems: Strategically Addressing Data Ethics and Policy Issues in LIS Curricula and Courses.” The session will be held on Tuesday, September 24th @ 3 PM in room 301B.

The panel will begin with introductory remarks by Drs. John Burgess, Natalie Greene Taylor, and Emily Knox, who recently published books with ALA Editions on information ethics and information policy. The introduction will follow three presentations addressing aspects of the panel’s theme. Finally, Drs. Burgess, Taylor, and Knox will act as discussants.

Joint Business Meeting

The SIGs are also holding a joint business meeting this year on Wednesday, September 25th @ 10:30 AM in room Ballroom G. The purpose of this joint meeting is to gain a better understanding on each SIG’s respective history, explore a potential merger of the SIGs, and develop action items for the forthcoming year. The SIG conveners extend a special invitation to past conveners and senior faculty who may historical information to share.

Joint Informal Social

Following the day’s activities, the SIGs invite their membership to join for an informal social at The Oliver Hotel’s Peter Kern Library on Wednesday, September 25th @ 8:30 PM. The Peter Kern Library is a speakeasy that serves craft cocktails. It is located at 407 Union Avenue. Find out more here: https://www.theoliverhotel.com/eat-drink/peter-kern-library

We look forward to seeing you all in Knoxville.

 

Sincerely,

Kyle Jones

Information Ethics SIG Convener

&

Jenna Kammer and Nicole Alemanne

Information Policy SIG Conveners

Reminder! ALISE Annual 2019: Information Ethics SIG Call for Proposals (DEADLINE EXTENDED)

September 24-26, 2019
Knoxville, Tennessee
Call for Proposals on the Topic
More Data, More Problems: Strategically Addressing Data Ethics Issues in Library and Information Science Education
Description
 
Library and information science schools are revising undergraduate and graduate curricula and individual courses to prepare students for data-centric careers, as well as to participate in a data-driven society. To meet these new challenges programs are developing courses on, among other things, data curation, analytics, visualization, algorithm design, and artificial intelligence. While such changes reflect new workforce and society needs, it remains to be seen whether or not such efforts adequately address the very real and serious ethics issues associated with related data practices (e.g., privacy, bias, fairness and justice). Some questions include:
    • Do programs need to reconsider the role of and learning outcomes related to data and information ethics in the curriculum?
    • What structural, organizational, and political issues emerge when attempting to embed data ethics into curricular designs?
    • How can instructors for whom data ethics is an unfamiliar area successfully address related issues in technical courses?
    • Can library and information science schools collaborate with their computer science peers to develop value-sensitive courses?
The ALISE Information Ethics SIG invites presentation proposals that tightly link data ethics to pedagogy, instructional design, curriculum design, and learning opportunities. The SIG especially encourages proposals that will provide session attendees with 1) actual strategies and/or resources for addressing data ethics in courses outside of information ethics and/or 2) opportunities to develop collaborations regarding data ethics education.
How To Submit an Abstract
Please submit a 500-word abstract via email to the SIG convener, Kyle Jones (kmlj@iupui.edu OR kylejones@thecorkboard.org), by February 28, 2019 DEADLINE EXTENDED TO March 10th, 2019. The abstract should include:
    1. A title for your presentation
    2. Presenter name(s) and affiliation(s)
    3. A topic narrative
    4. And three knowledge and/or skill outcomes attendees will learn by the end of your talk

ALISE Annual 2019: Information Ethics SIG Call for Proposals

September 24-26, 2019
Knoxville, Tennessee
Call for Proposals on the Topic
More Data, More Problems: Strategically Addressing Data Ethics Issues in Library and Information Science Education
Description
 
Library and information science schools are revising undergraduate and graduate curricula and individual courses to prepare students for data-centric careers, as well as to participate in a data-driven society. To meet these new challenges programs are developing courses on, among other things, data curation, analytics, visualization, algorithm design, and artificial intelligence. While such changes reflect new workforce and society needs, it remains to be seen whether or not such efforts adequately address the very real and serious ethics issues associated with related data practices (e.g., privacy, bias, fairness and justice). Some questions include:
    • Do programs need to reconsider the role of and learning outcomes related to data and information ethics in the curriculum?
    • What structural, organizational, and political issues emerge when attempting to embed data ethics into curricular designs?
    • How can instructors for whom data ethics is an unfamiliar area successfully address related issues in technical courses?
    • Can library and information science schools collaborate with their computer science peers to develop value-sensitive courses?
The ALISE Information Ethics SIG invites presentation proposals that tightly link data ethics to pedagogy, instructional design, curriculum design, and learning opportunities. The SIG especially encourages proposals that will provide session attendees with 1) actual strategies and/or resources for addressing data ethics in courses outside of information ethics and/or 2) opportunities to develop collaborations regarding data ethics education.
How To Submit an Abstract
Please submit a 500-word abstract via email to the SIG convener, Kyle Jones (kmlj@iupui.edu OR kylejones@thecorkboard.org), by February 28, 2019. The abstract should include:
    1. A title for your presentation
    2. Presenter name(s) and affiliation(s)
    3. A topic narrative
    4. And three knowledge and/or skill outcomes attendees will learn by the end of your talk

Call for ALISE Webinars

Fellow IE SIG members,

Consider developing a webinar for ALISE. See the organization’s call quoted below. The final bullet point, “teaching controversial, tough, or unpopular topics,” may be particularly relevant to our SIG. Also, there was sustained conversation at ALISE ’18 regarding the integration of information ethics and policy topics into technology courses.  I imagine ALISE would welcome a webinar on that topic.

Sincerely,

~Kyle~

————————————
————————————

Kyle M. L. Jones (MLIS, PhD)
Assistant Professor

Indiana University-Indianapolis (IUPUI)
School of Informatics and Computing
Department of Library and Information Science

We are inviting proposals for the ALISE webinar series. We are looking for submissions on the topics relevant to the research and practice of LIS education that will be of interest to ALISE members. Topics that are current and relevant, cover innovative approaches, and have practical application are particularly welcome. We encourage potential presenters to consider how their proposed offering compares to other similar professional development opportunities.

Sample topics that we’d like to see covered are (but not limited to):

  • undergraduate programs in information science;
  • engaging students with disabilities effectively;
  • technology-based innovation in the classroom;
  • using student evaluations effectively;
  • diversifying and internationalizing your curriculum;
  • rethinking long-standing assignment, testing, and grading practices;
  • capstone projects and e-portfolios;
  • service-based and experiential learning;
  • internships and co-op education;
  • teaching controversial, tough, or unpopular topics.

Please consult the webinar submission guidelines: http://www.alise.org/webinar-proposals and the list of previous webinars: http://www.alise.org/webinar-archive. Please note that all webinar proposals have to be submitted using the online webinar submission form found here: http://www.alise.org/webinar-proposals (“Submit your proposal”).

The webinar co-coordinators Keren Dali and Dan Albertson are happy to discuss webinar ideas and help you develop your proposals. We are also ready to help potential presenters with similar interests find and team up with each other.

Webinar proposals can be submitted at any time. However, to improve your chances of acceptance and to help us with building the schedule, we encourage you to submit your proposal by June 30, 2018.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the webinar co-coordinators. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Keren (keren.dali@alumni.utoronto.ca) and Dan (dalbert@buffalo.edu).

Consider Publishing in the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy (JIFP)

Fellow Info Ethics SIG members,

Please consider the following message from our colleague, Shannon Oltmann, regarding publishing in the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy (JIFP).

I am writing as the incoming Senior Editor for the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy (JIFP). It is a relatively new publication, beginning in 2016. This journal is produced quarterly by the Office of Intellectual Freedom of the American Library Association.

The focus of the journal includes the following: “refereed essays and peer-reviewed articles on intellectual freedom and privacy, as well as book reviews, legal briefs and opinion pieces. Our goal is to have JIFP at the center of discourse on intellectual freedom and privacy issues in libraries.” As this indicates, many of the peer-reviewed articles we publish do focus on intellectual freedom and privacy in libraries; however, we also publish broader articles that look beyond libraries (for example, recent articles discussed book banning in the Tucson Unified School District and how editorials in newspapers have discussed privacy over time).

If you have any questions, including whether your paper fits within the scope, please contact me at shannon.oltmann@uky.edu. Thank you for considering the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy as a venue for your work.

Dr. Shannon M. Oltmann
Assistant Professor
School of Information Science
University of Kentucky

Thanks,

~Kyle~

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————————————

Kyle M. L. Jones (MLIS, PhD)
Assistant Professor

Indiana University-Indianapolis (IUPUI)
School of Informatics and Computing
Department of Library and Information Science

ALISE IE Webinar Proposals

If anyone is interested in running an information ethics themed webinar for ALISE, consider making a submission at the following link: ALISEXChange Webinar Proposals

I did one last year, and it was both well attended and enjoyable. I highly encourage you consider proposing one if you’re interested. Here is the associated promo text for it.

“ALISE and its members provide leadership in shaping quality Library and Information Science education.

We invite members to submit proposals for webinars on topics that support innovative pedagogy and the scholarship of teaching and learning in the field of Library and Information Science and cognate areas.”

Let me know in comments if you have any questions or ideas.

New Information Ethics SIG e-list.

Good news, the ALISE IE SIG has a new email list hosted by Memberclicks on the ALISE website. Current ALISE members can log into their ALISE account, select “My Profile” then select “My Features”. The e-list will be listed there for you to subscribe to. See the image below:

image004

The hope is to use this list for discussion of information ethics related topics and ideas for what you would like to see from your SIG. We’re looking forward to seeing you there.

Article Roundup for June 11, 2015

The following articles are a selection of information ethics and information ethics adjacent articles discovered in the past day. Sharing does not equate endorsement.

Belle, Stuart M. 2015. “Knowledge Stewardship as an Ethos-Driven Approach to Business Ethics.” Journal of Business Ethics, June, 1–9. doi:10.1007/s10551-015-2710-5.
Abstract: As a field spanning interests among researchers and business professionals, business ethics aims to provide guidance on what can be considered morally right, socially acceptable and legally transparent dealings in the human activity of providing goods or services for trade. Yet, cohesive theory of the ethics of business is lacking, and current ethical practices often fall victim to fluctuating business conditions and circumstances. Thus, stewardship theory is proposed as a more enduring and empowering orientation to more mindful business ethics that is borne out of organizational character, and knowledge stewardship is introduced as a set of practices that can support improved ethical behavior in organizations from an ethos-driven perspective. A definition of knowledge stewardship is provided in this article, and its associated outcomes of authenticity, authority and advocacy are highlighted. Practical recommendations are put forward to assist organizations in their development of stronger stewardship behavior, and exploratory research questions that heighten attentiveness to knowledge stewardship are presented.

Pantić, Nataša. 2015. “A Model for Study of Teacher Agency for Social Justice.” Teachers and Teaching 0 (0): 1–20. doi:10.1080/13540602.2015.1044332.

Abstract: Internationally teachers are called upon to act as agents of change. However, there is little clarity about the kind of change teachers are expected to contribute to and even less empirical evidence about the ways teacher agency operates in schools and beyond. Empirical analyses of teacher agency require a clear articulation of the purpose and content of such agency in relation to a particular aspect of change, which could then help us specify appropriate units of analysis and generate hypotheses based on the insights provided by previous research. This paper articulates a model for study of teacher agency as a process whereby teachers act strategically to transform the risks of exclusion and underachievement into inclusion and improved outcomes for all students in contexts of cultural and social diversity. The model is guided by social theories of human agency within social structures and cultures, applied to the empirical insights into teachers’ inclusive practices. Potentially appropriate units of analysis and related variables are proposed, and face-validated in consultation with 12 experts from Scotland including teachers, (deputy) head teachers, researchers, teacher educators and policy-makers. The units include teachers’ inclusive practices at individual, school and broader policy and social levels, teachers’ moral purposes and competence as agents of change for inclusive education, scope of teachers’ autonomy including individual, collective and contextual variables, and teachers’ reflexivity. Implications for future research and teacher education are discussed.

Van Deventer, Idilette, Philip C. Van der Westhuizen, and Ferdinand J. Potgieter. 2015. “Social Justice Praxis in Education: Towards Sustainable Management Strategies.” South African Journal of Education 35 (2): 956.

Abstract: Social justice, defined as an impetus towards a socially just educational world, is based on the assumption that all people, irrespective of belief or societal position, are entitled to be treated according to the values of human rights, human dignity and equality. Diverging from the classical positivist approach in social science research that takes injustice as its impetus, the researchers departed from a socio-rationalist approach into exploring sustainable management strategies for effective social justice praxis. This approach has enabled the construction of a conceptual-theoretical framework and an iterative qualitative inquiry, which has as its central principal the sustainable management strategies for effective social justice praxis. Four key findings affirmed the belief that good praxis was to be found in Gemeinschaft relationships, in the influence exerted by government and education systems and structures, where government and principals were found to be co-responsible in ensuring that the best interest of the child was served. This responsibility included practices found in collaborative efforts, where communities became the guardians of their schools due to a disciplined school that followed constitutional values. Lastly, these practitioners aligned their management strategies with human rights values, as well as human dignity and equality, and their strategies found pride of place in extant ubuntu principles.

ALISE IE SIG 2016 CFP

The ALISE Information Ethics SIG calls for participation in our sessions at the annual ALISE conference January 5-8, 2016 in Boston. This year, the IE SIG is seeking participants for two sessions. The first is a paper session and will feature three or four presenters. The second uses a “lightning talk” format and will feature up to ten presenters.

In keeping with the conference theme, we invite people to submit papers and presentations that map one or more aspects of Dr. Dresang’s theory of radical change onto information ethics concepts. Radical change theory examines fundamental changes or departures from the usual or traditional, focusing on themes of interactivity, connectivity, and access. Preference in the paper session will be given to papers which focus on theory, while preference in the lightning talk session will be given to ideas of how to put radical change into ethical practice. Feel free to submit papers on any information ethics topic, and you are welcomed to submit proposals for both sessions.

Submission Guidelines

All proposals for IE SIG sessions should be submitted by July 1, 2015 to John Burgess (burge042@bama.ua.edu). In the subject line please indicate: IE SIG Proposal. ALISE members interested in presenting during the Information Ethics SIG paper session should submit an abstract of their research consisting of no more than 750 words. Those interested in participating in the lightning round presentations should submit a description of up to 400 words on your idea. The co-conveners will review all submissions and select those to be in the session proposals for the Information Ethics SIG. All individuals who submit a proposal will be notified of the conveners’ decision by July 15. Final notification of acceptance of the Information Ethics SIG programs will be shared by September 15, 2015.

Please address any questions or comments to the Information Ethics SIG co-conveners:

Emily J.M. Knox, Ph.D., MSLIS
Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
knox@ilinois.edu

John T. F. Burgess, PhD, STM, MLIS
Adjunct Instructor
School of Library and Information Studies
The University of Alabama
burge042@bama.ua.edu

ALISE 2015 IE SIG Call for Papers

Call for Papers Information Ethics Special Interest Group

ALISE 2015, Chicago, IL, January 27-30, 2015

Conference Theme: Mirrors & Windows: Reflections on Social Justice and Re-imagining LIS Education

DEADLINE: July 10, 2014

The ALISE Information Ethics SIG calls for papers to be presented during the SIG’s conference program at the annual ALISE conference January 27-30, 2015 in Chicago. Submitted papers should support the ALISE Information Ethics SIG theme as well as the 2015 conference theme, Reflections on Social Justice and Re-imagining LIS Education (http://www.alise.org).

Submission Guidelines
ALISE members interested in presenting during the Information Ethics SIG program should submit an abstract of their research consisting of no more than 750 words by July 10, 2014 to John Burgess (burge042@bama.ua.edu).  In the subject line please indicate:  Info Ethics Paper Proposal.  The convener of this SIG will review all submissions and select three or four to be incorporated into a proposal for the Information Ethics SIG (due July 15, 2014). All individuals who submit a proposal will be notified of the convener’s decision by July 15. Final notification of acceptance of the Information Ethics SIG program will be shared by September 15, 2014.

2015 IE SIG Theme
In keeping with the conference theme reflecting on social justice in LIS education, this call for papers is an invitation to consider how social justice theories can inform new avenues of information ethics research, teaching, or practice in the LIS domain. Social justice theory is already an established part of information ethics within LIS education, as seen in the Position Statement on Information Ethics in LIS Education. Yet, many expressions of information ethics in LIS have objectives focusing on individual rights rather than on social change: academic and intellectual freedom, the freedom to read, and the right to privacy. Focusing on social justice theory creates an opportunity to look beyond those existing areas of strength and toward other beneficial ethical approaches within the LIS domain.

Examples of possible research topics include:
1). Considering the limits of human rights-based systems of information ethics in promoting social justice
2). Cognitive justice and the role of librarians and information scientists in healing cultural violence
3). Approaches to countering cultural biases implicit in narratives of the information society and digital divide
4). Uses of social justice theories and critical pedagogy to enrich existing information ethics courses and modules
5). Other topics will be considered as long as they deal with the intersection of social justice and information ethics.

Please address any questions or comments to the Information Ethics SIG Convener:
Dr. John T. F. Burgess
Adjunct Instructor
School of Library and Information Studies
The University of Alabama
burge042@bama.ua.edu